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Files

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file_icons/generic.pngBuoyancy and Drag

Short Description:

Purpose of calculation:
Buoyancy and drag

Calculation Reference
http://hyperphysics.phy-astr.gsu.edu/hbase/lindrg.html

Calculation Validation
Reproduction of a sample calculation from a published calculation reference.

Calculation Reference
Fluid Mechanics
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Viscosity
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Hydraulics
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Version History
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Submitted By:
stuart1
Submitted On:
06 Oct 2010
Downloads:
50
Rating:
stars/5.gifTotal Votes:2

file_icons/XL.pngCNG compressor design.xlsx

Short Description:
Calculation Preview





A diaphragm compressor (also known as a membrane compressor) is a variant of the conventional reciprocating compressor. The compression of gas occurs by the movement of a flexible membrane, instead of an intake element. The back and forth movement of the membrane is driven by a rod and a crankshaft mechanism. Only the membrane and the compressor box come in contact with the gas being compressed. Diaphragm compressors are used for hydrogen and compressed natural gas (CNG) as well as in a number of other applications.

Calculation Reference
Compressor Design
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CNG Compressed Natural Gas
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Perry's Chemical Engineers Handbook
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Version History
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Submitted By:
mehrgardi
Submitted On:
10 Aug 2011
Downloads:
24
Rating:
stars/3.gifTotal Votes:1

file_icons/XL.pngCOMPRESSED AIR SYSTEM

Short Description:
Calculation Preview



COMPRESSED AIR SYSTEM SIZING CALCULATION

 COMPRESSOR FAD CALCULATION
Selected Flow nm3/min  
FAD temperature deg C 
Reference temperature deg C 
Standard inlet pressure bar a 
Normal reference pressure bar a 
FAD flow l/s   
Selected compressor   

RECEIVER SIZING CALCULATION
Compressor capacity l/s 
Compressor inlet pressure bar a 
Maximum inlet temperature Deg K 
Maximum cycle frequency cycle/30s 
Pressure difference between load & unload bar 
Compressed air outlet temperature Deg K 
Minimum Volume of receiver liter
Selected receiver volume m3 
  
INTERMITTENT OUTPUT RECEIVER SIZING
Air flow requirement l/s 
Time of emptying phase Sec 
Permitted pressure drop bar 
Receiver volume l 
Selected receiver volume m3 
  
CONDENSATION QUANTITY
Relative humidity % 
Amount of water the air can carry  at ambient g/m3 
Maximum water quantity g/s 

Calculation Reference
Compressed Air
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Reciever Sizing Calculation
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Air Pressure Tools
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Version History
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Submitted By:
ratnadeep1972
Submitted On:
23 Apr 2013
Downloads:
27
Rating:
stars/0.gifTotal Votes:0

file_icons/generic.pngFluid Jets

Short Description:
Calculation Preview




Forces Resulting from fluid jets , flow over plate,  vanes and through pipes          

Calculation Reference          
   Roymech.co.uk.  http://www.roymech.co.uk/Related/Fluids/Fluids_Jets.html    

 
Purpose of Calculation          
To calculate the force resulting from the fluid momentum changes from impacting plates, from flowing over vanes and flowing through pipes.       
         
The various calculations have been checked against each other and against examples in the identified references. Notes providing  background for the calculations are provided on the above website.       
          
The study of forces resulting from the impact of fluid jets, and when fluids are diverted,  involves the application of Newtons second law in the form of F = m.a. The forces are determined by calculating the change of momentum of the flowing fluids.    In nature these forces manifest themselves in the form of wind forces, and the impact forces of the sea on the harbour walls.   The operation of hydro-kinetic machines such as turbines depends on forces developed through changing the momentum of flowing fluids.          
          
In its simplest form, with steady flow conditions, the force on a fluid flow in a set direction is equal to its mass flow rate times by the change in velocity in that set direction.   The fluid flow also exerts an equal and opposite reaction force as a result of this change in momentum.           
          
These are ideal values and do not take into account losses due to friction or the effect of gravity          
          
 F = m. (u1 - u2)  =  Qρ (u1 - u2) = V.A.ρ (u1 - u2) . ..( F and u are vector quantities)         
          
 F= Force in set direction on component changing the direction of flow.         
 m.  = mass flow rate    kg/s      
 Q= volume flow velocity   (m3/s)      
 ρ = fluid density   (kg/m3)      
 u1  &  u2 = flow velocities before and after contact with component       m/s  
 V = velocity of jet.   m/s Note: V is generally equal to  to u1     
 A = Area of jet.   m2      
          
          
1) Fluid force on a flat fixed plate          
2) Fluid force on a angled fixed plate ( <90o )          
3) Fluid force on a angled fixed plate  ( > 90o )          
4) Fluid force on a angled fixedplate  ( = 180o )          
5) Fluid force on a flat moving plate          
6) Fluid force on an angled moving plate  
7) Fluid force on a static vane
8) Fluid force on a moving vane        
9) Fluid Force on a pipe nozzle
10) fluid Force on a pipe bend

Calculation Reference
Mechanical Engineers Data Handbook Carvill
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Mechanics of Fluids Massey
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Fluid Mechanics
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Version History
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Submitted By:
roymech1
Submitted On:
03 Jul 2011
Downloads:
49
Rating:
stars/5.gifTotal Votes:2

file_icons/generic.pngForce-momentum fluid at hydraulic jump.xls

Short Description:

Purpose of calculation: Use the force-momentum principle to calculate the forces at hydraulic jump in the x and y directions, Fx and Fy respectively.

Calculation Validation: Validated against worked example in lecture notes.

Calculation Reference
Hydraulics
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Fluid Mechanics
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Version History
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Submitted By:
stuart1
Submitted On:
13 Jul 2010
Downloads:
45
Rating:
stars/3.gifTotal Votes:3

file_icons/excel.gifLoad on bends and reducers.xls

Short Description:

Load on bends, reducers ... Application of Linear Momentum Equation

Calculation Reference
Fluid Mechanics
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Version History

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Submitted By:
dino
Submitted On:
30 Mar 2009
Downloads:
397
Rating:
stars/5.gifTotal Votes:2

file_icons/generic.pngPressure discharge and power calcs of a jet.xls

Short Description:

Purpose of calculation: Calculate the pressure, discharge and power input to feed a jet of water of initial diameter 107mm which projects 156m vertically. This is the actual size of the jet at Lake Geneva.

Calculation Reference: Hydraulics

Calculation Validation: Validated against worked example in lecture notes.

Calculation Reference
Hydraulics
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Fluid Mechanics
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Version History
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Submitted By:
stuart1
Submitted On:
13 Jul 2010
Downloads:
35
Rating:
stars/5.gifTotal Votes:1

file_icons/excel.gifR134A.xls

Short Description:

R134a is also known as Tetrafluoroethane (CF3CH2F) from the family of HFC refrigerant. With the discovery of the damaging effect of